Schools, Adults and kids during a Mental Health Crisis

Changes to school are negatively impacting Gen Z. Most Gen Z teens ages 13–17 (81%) report they have experienced negative impacts of pandemic-related school closures, and half (51%) say the pandemic makes planning for their future feel impossible. Like teens, 2 in 3 Gen Z adults in college (67%) say the pandemic makes planning for their future feel impossible. Further, most Gen Z adults in college (87%) report education is a significant source of stress in their lives.

“Loneliness and uncertainly about the future are major stressors for adolescents and young adults, who are striving to find their places in the world, both socially, and in terms of education and work. The pandemic and its economic consequences are upending youths’ social lives and their visions for their futures,” said Emma Adam, PhD, Edwina S. Tarry Professor of Education and Social Policy. “We must work to provide social, emotional and mental health supports to this generation, while providing much-needed financial assistance and educational and work opportunities for youth. Both comfort now and hope for the future are essential for the long-term well-being of this generation.”

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Stress in America

Stress in AmericaTM 2020: A National Mental Health Crisis, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of APA, found that nearly 8 in 10 adults (78%) say the coronavirus pandemic is a significant source of stress in their lives, while 3 in 5 (60%) say the number of issues America faces is overwhelming to them. Gen Z adults, on average, say their stress level during the prior month is 6.1, on a scale from 1 to 10 where 1 means “little to no stress” and 10 means “a great deal of stress.” This compares with a reported average stress level among all adults of 5.0.

Nearly 1 in 5 adults (19%) say their mental health is worse than it was at this time last year. By generation, 34% of Gen Z adults report worse mental health, followed by Gen X (21%), millennials (19%), boomers (12%) and older adults (8%). Gen Z adults are the most likely to report experiencing common symptoms of depression, with more than 7 in 10 noting that in the prior two weeks they felt so tired that they sat around and did nothing (75%), felt very restless (74%), found it hard to think properly or concentrate (73%), felt lonely (73%), or felt miserable or unhappy (71%).

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CDC Statistics for Adults

The CDC data is not the only research to indicate a widespread increase in mental health issues, particularly anxiety. Recently, the Kaiser Family Foundation released the results of a poll showing that 53% of respondents believe COVID-19 is taking a toll on their mental health, an increase of 14% since May.2

  • Anxiety/depression symptoms: 31%
  • Trauma/stressor-related disorder symptoms: 26%
  • Started or increased substance use: 13%
  • Seriously considered suicide: 11%
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Mental Health in Adults

The COVID-19 pandemic is causing significant increases in mental health conditions and substance use, with 40% of adults struggling in the United States, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).1

Experts fear that prolonged stress and ongoing uncertainty may have lasting consequences for our mental health.

“The brain loves certainty, familiarity, routines, plans, and habits. When those are missing, it can be very challenging. When they’re missing for months, and potentially long into the future, then it gets even more problematic, ” says Paul Nestadt, MD, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

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Wonderland Fantasy

Excited to share that iConquer Brain Health: Wonderland of Fantasy has been submitted to Cannes Film Festival!Mental health is one of the most current eminent problems in the United States of America and Covid-19 has further exacerbated it.click here to watch! https://youtu.be/xKCWJDpgiGg

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